"Kom je hier vaker of zo?! Congratulations! You have just earned the Rotterdam badge on Shippr! Ja toch?!"

"Kom je hier vaker of zo?! Congratulations! You have just earned the Rotterdam badge on Shippr! Ja toch?!"

Planning For A Future Of Robot Ships | Popular Science
So the real challenge for unmanned shipping, much like for commercial drones, will come from two places: the development of technology for safe remote operation, and the modernization of laws governing transportation. Complicating the latter challenge is that the body of law governing international waters, territorial waters, and how they interact is vast and complex. Another snag is the U.S. reluctance to ratify the United Nations Convention On The Law Of The Sea, which is the main framework under which the rest of the world operates.
To overcome the technical challenges of making ships that sail without sailors, a multi-country group under the European Union is working on a project called Maritime Unmanned Navigation through Intelligence in Networks (MUNIN), which aims to develop autonomous ships that can, when needed, be controlled from shore.

Planning For A Future Of Robot Ships | Popular Science

So the real challenge for unmanned shipping, much like for commercial drones, will come from two places: the development of technology for safe remote operation, and the modernization of laws governing transportation. Complicating the latter challenge is that the body of law governing international waters, territorial waters, and how they interact is vast and complex. Another snag is the U.S. reluctance to ratify the United Nations Convention On The Law Of The Sea, which is the main framework under which the rest of the world operates.

To overcome the technical challenges of making ships that sail without sailors, a multi-country group under the European Union is working on a project called Maritime Unmanned Navigation through Intelligence in Networks (MUNIN), which aims to develop autonomous ships that can, when needed, be controlled from shore.

Field research in the Port of Amsterdam.

Field research in the Port of Amsterdam.

Shippr venue icons for the Port of Rotterdam.

Shippr venue icons for the Port of Rotterdam.

A first glimpse of the various venues inside the Port of Rotterdam where ships check-in on Shippr.

A first glimpse of the various venues inside the Port of Rotterdam where ships check-in on Shippr.

JSON export of Shippr port locations in Rotterdam.

Raising the Costa Concordia | Reuters.com

Engineers attempt one of the most expensive wreck removal operations in history: raising an Italian cruise ship that capsized in 2012.

We are in Berlin at the incredible Next Berlin conference, hosting the workshop Internet of Ships. This is a heads up for anyone who is in the city who’d like to hang out and talk ship.
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According to the International Maritime Organization, about 90% of all world trade is carried by sea. Inspired by the seas of data shipping generates, Shippr iwill become a general-purpose maritime datastore. We intend to fully open up the store for anyone to use, and to build applications on top through the Shippr app which will follow soon after. We will also develop a ‘Foursquare for ships’. And AIS transponders will allow to check-in ships automatically into locations like ports, locks, repair-docks, oil platforms and off-shore anchor places, and into events e.g. like bunkering, storm, sale, collision and piracy. By looking at ships as individuals with their own timelines and using the logic of checking into locations and events, we hope to build a meaningful interface for exploring the hidden world of the seas.
Our workshop is directly related to Shippr. Our key findings and / or questions are:
* Can maritime data be used as monitor to expose economic mechanisms? * What models can be used to recognise patterns, make predictions and find anomalies? * How can social media be used to connect ships, (port) authorities and the public at large?
Our maritime datastore is currently holding location data and specifications (size, type, etc…) of ships in the Port of Rotterdam. The aim of the workshop is to find methods to transform this set into information and or to relate it to external resources. Ideally we could establish a(n) (concept of an) application within this short period of time. During the workshop participants will get access to our database trough an API.
(via Internet of shipsNEXT Berlin)

We are in Berlin at the incredible Next Berlin conference, hosting the workshop Internet of Ships. This is a heads up for anyone who is in the city who’d like to hang out and talk ship.

According to the International Maritime Organization, about 90% of all world trade is carried by sea. Inspired by the seas of data shipping generates, Shippr iwill become a general-purpose maritime datastore. We intend to fully open up the store for anyone to use, and to build applications on top through the Shippr app which will follow soon after. We will also develop a ‘Foursquare for ships’. And AIS transponders will allow to check-in ships automatically into locations like ports, locks, repair-docks, oil platforms and off-shore anchor places, and into events e.g. like bunkering, storm, sale, collision and piracy. By looking at ships as individuals with their own timelines and using the logic of checking into locations and events, we hope to build a meaningful interface for exploring the hidden world of the seas.

Our workshop is directly related to Shippr. Our key findings and / or questions are:

* Can maritime data be used as monitor to expose economic mechanisms?
* What models can be used to recognise patterns, make predictions and find anomalies?
* How can social media be used to connect ships, (port) authorities and the public at large?

Our maritime datastore is currently holding location data and specifications (size, type, etc…) of ships in the Port of Rotterdam. The aim of the workshop is to find methods to transform this set into information and or to relate it to external resources. Ideally we could establish a(n) (concept of an) application within this short period of time. During the workshop participants will get access to our database trough an API.

(via Internet of shipsNEXT Berlin)

At the beginning of march students of studio (Re)charge Information had a 2-day workshop with Dutch data specialists Juha van’t Zelfde (cofounder of the VURB foundation) and Maurits De Bruijn. Students were building connections between databases and twitter messages to visualize the spatial opportunities of big data and civic media. Juha and Maurits also presented their Shippr project – a maritime datastore. One of the students, journalist Maria Romakina has talked to Juha and Maurits about the project and how ships will communicate through social networks in the nearest future.
(via Blog - Strelka Institute for media, architecture and design)

At the beginning of march students of studio (Re)charge Information had a 2-day workshop with Dutch data specialists Juha van’t Zelfde (cofounder of the VURB foundation) and Maurits De Bruijn. Students were building connections between databases and twitter messages to visualize the spatial opportunities of big data and civic media. Juha and Maurits also presented their Shippr project – a maritime datastore. One of the students, journalist Maria Romakina has talked to Juha and Maurits about the project and how ships will communicate through social networks in the nearest future.

(via Blog - Strelka Institute for media, architecture and design)

Shippr at Hack de Overheid Open Haven Data workshop

Op de Hackathon wordt tevens een workshop georganiseerd rondom de Rotterdamse Haven. Welke informatie over de Haven kan er ontsloten worden en hoe kan de stad Rotterdam en de Haven meer met elkaar worden verbonden? Verschillende apps en websites laten op een speelse wijze zien hoe er interessante dingen kunnen worden gedaan met de data van de Rotterdamse haven.

Programma:

  • Presentatie van Shippr: een nieuw concept rond haven data 
  • Presentate Superebb door Jan-Geert Munneke 
  • moderatie door Albert Veenstra van TNO